Bossa for Alice Latin Jazz

Started by Klangsport, © All Rights Reserved 2015

   
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BOSSA 2 RMIX1 Uploaded 2yr+5mo ago by RealAl



Mix   Accepted   audio/mpeg   7.08 MB   Engineering-Scratch Demo   8 Plays   0 Downloads  

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Klangsport   commented 2yr+5mo ago


I like this version, too! It really enhances the style, esp. around the fills (this comment comes from someone without any drumming knowledge whatsoever... :). If not too much of an ask: I love the producer freedom and would pick and choose between the two versions wherever either fits better - again, can you upload the seps? Thanks so much! Markus

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RealAl   commented 2yr+5mo ago


Producer's Privilege. I will upload the wavs, and Mix and Match at your digression. I tried to keep it simple, to not interfere with the excellent vocals, instrumentalism, and overall feel. This is an excellent piece, and I think someone will pick this up!

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Klangsport   commented 2yr+5mo ago


Thanks for the seps - just a quick question: are the BD and the set tracks M/S or L/R stereo?

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RealAl   commented 2yr+5mo ago


I am not sure what you are asking. Here's the way I do it: I have 4 mics set-up; BSDRM, SNARE, SET( for HH, Crash, TOMs), and Overhead - centered. I record to a TASCAM in 24 bit. I sometimes tune to the song, or muffle for effects, whatever. When I have it close to correct on two versions, I upload all to AUDACITY, and usually tweek from there, maybe fix a weak snare, or bass drum, or do some doubling, or ReVerB. Then, I mix a rough mp3 for comments. The WAVs from AUDACITY are 16 bit, mono. That's what ends up as SEPS.

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Klangsport   commented 2yr+5mo ago


Ah no worries, then, I will work it out. I was referring to a mid/side channel arrangement versus the left/right way of recording (see e.g. http://blog.shure.com/five-techniques-for-stereo-miking-drums/). I was merely surprised a bit by the BD stereo approach that I hadn't seen so far.

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RealAl   commented 2yr+5mo ago


Thank you for the drum mic link. I have used Shure mics. Audio Technica has merit, too, but it seems Condenser mics are the way to go. Unfortunately, they bleed, and in a studio, the Engineers seem to hate that because it makes editing, and cutting-and-pasting extremely tough. Yet, if you visit YouTube, and listen to David Axelrod's "HOLY THURSDAY" you will hear what just two overheads can pick-up. Of course, the Drummer was Earl Palmer, arguably THE BEST studio drummer ever, so editing was just another take. Very little cut-and-paste for his stuff. Nevertheless, I learn more about my instruments everyday. Thanks again.

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Klangsport   commented 2yr+5mo ago


Generally, a full drum-set microphone set contains both condenser (small/large diaphragm) as well as dynamic mics, depending on the drum being recorded. I found another article that might be interesting to you as it goes about what to do when recording drums with a limited set of either microphones or tracks available: https://ehomerecordingstudio.com/drum-microphones/ On a budget I have heard good things about the Samson series of drum mic sets, either the DK705 or the DK707 (review here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kONgqGEC3kQ). Cheers, Markus

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RealAl   commented 2yr+5mo ago


I have the CAD Pro drum mics and the audioT as my overhead. It's all about placement and playing. I hope I get better playing, and someone else gets better at placement! ;-) Thanks for the links. I will certainly follow-up on them.