Sound Engineering & Recording

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SirEdgeingtonBlue / Josh Miller 10 days ago
What does everyone think of using artificially pitch shifted sax for horn section simulation/thickening. 3 tracks of sax panned L,R,C one channel dropped an octave. Center channel blended 50% standard and octave. One channel unaltered and placed higher in the mix.


   

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sriracha   commented 10 days ago


Well, as a sax player (not a great one, lol, but I've played since I was 12) you can tell it's not real sax to start with when you start shifting pitch etc. (I know this is Jer's playing, of course.) Sax is a complicated sound like the human voice - tones of formants and all that. However, the same techniques of subtle thickening that you can use on voice can be used to accomplish that on sax. Cory turned me onto this guy, and this particular technique works great on vox: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwIZ35CAA5Y

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Redfish   commented 10 days ago


If you want real trumpets ... just give me a ping -Red

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SirEdgeingtonBlue   commented 10 days ago


the real deal is always welcome.

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tbase2000   commented 9 days ago


They sound good as the horn stabs I assume you are talking about. To much verb compared to the rest of the song but I think the rest of the instruments need more verb. Is the first sax part besides the horns (1:05) just a split between two sax takes, one dropped an octave? I don't really like the equal volume split honestly.

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SirEdgeingtonBlue   commented 9 days ago


Entire first sax section processed the same way. And I will tell you it sounds most natural dropped an octave. Harmonizing at any other intervals really makes it fall apart.

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tbase2000   commented 9 days ago


You have the high sax on the same side as the strumming cello or whatever that is doing 8th notes. Those two should be rhythmic partners, equal volume and panned opposite sides. The lower sax lower in volume and in the distance wider than the cello. Second chair rules. Your not that important.